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Parent

Child advocates urge parents to be vigilant to protect children from predators

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

by: Quametra Wilborn | Posted: Jul 24, 2020 / 03:48 PM CDT / Updated: Jul 24, 2020 / 04:37 PM CDT

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Child therapists are sending a warning to parents when it comes to keeping their children safe from predators.

Advocates say parents need to keep their ears and eyes open and remain vigilant when it comes to their children.

This warning comes after four men were indicted for sex crimes against children, all under the age of 4.

Investigators say they have statements from the defendants and cell phone recordings as evidence of the crimes. Investigators say in October of 2016, Isiah Hayes admitted he was recorded and directed by Daerius Ice to inappropriately touch a 9-month-old girl.

Hayes was 17 at the time of the incident.

Youth Villages Dogwood Director Colby Jonas says parents and caretakers must be fully aware of the signs of sexual abuse.

“Behaviorally, they could start acting out,” Jonas said. “Physically they could be more aggressive. They could have more sexualized conversations. They could be touching themselves in more of a public setting.”

Jonas says it’s common to see older children sexually abuse younger children, mainly due to unresolved trauma.

“Their boundaries are poor,” Jonas said. “They may have or may not have received treatment when their trauma occurred. So, they’re more susceptible to engaging in risky behavior, abusive behavior as they get older.”

In separate incidents, court documents show both Antoine Wilson And Antonio King admitted to filming themselves committing sexual acts with children. Authorities say Wilson allegedly kidnapped his 4-year-old victim from her yard in southwest Memphis.

Jonas says while predators are lurking, child sex crimes can be preventable with proper vigilance.

“If you are leaving your child in the care of someone else that you know and checked in on who that person is, you’re going to want to know if they are having anybody else over to their home while you are leaving your child with them,” Jonas said.

Child advocates say if you have any suspicions a child is a victim of abuse, you should report it to authorities or a mandated reporter such as a doctor or a teacher immediately.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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More great reads…..

3 Ways to Make Gluten Free Shortcrust Pastry

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By Kimi | kimi-eats-gluteen-free

Published on April 5, 2020 

With Easter just around the corner always being the best excuse to get cooking, I thought I would share with you my three go-to gluten free shortcrust pastry recipes I’ve been using for years. Including a classic pastry, a yoghurt based version and a low carb/grain free alternative made with coconut flour.

I know this Spring is unlike any other and I hope you’re all staying safe in these strange times. And if you’re reading this in the future, from the other side of this pandemic craziness, then thank god this is all over! But while many of us won’t get to spend time with family, at least we can all still find comfort in delicious homemade foods this Easter! 🐣

P.S.: These can be used for both sweet and savoury recipes, but feel free to adjust the sugar quantities according to the recipes you’re using or your own personal taste. These are not very sweet at all so if you’re making desserts and like your pastry to be quite sweet, feel free to add more sugar. 👍

Gluten free cream pie topped with sweetened cream cheese and strawberries + mini pumpkin pie with whipped cream and a sprinkle of cinnamon + homemade pop tarts made with gluten free shortcrust pastry

My 3 Gluten Free Shortcrust Pastry Recipes:

3 Ways to Make Gluten Free Shortcrust Pastry 

Author: Kimi

Recipe type: Baking

Ingredients

Classic Shortcrust Pastry:

  • 150g plain all purpose gluten free flour blend (I used Doves Farm)
  • 25g granulated sugar (or less – 1 tsp – in savoury dishes)
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum (optional / only if you flour blend doesn’t already contain it)
  • ⅛ tsp salt
  • 70g unsalted butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg white (to use as egg wash)

Yoghurt Shortcrust Pastry:

  • 130g plain all purpose gluten free flour blend (I used Doves Farm)
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 55g unsalted butter
  • 40g (2-3 Tbsp) plain Greek style yoghurt
  • 1 large egg (half for the pastry and the other half to use as egg wash)

Low Carb Coconut Shortcrust Pastry:

  • 85g coconut flour
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 90g unsalted butter
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1-2 tsp water
  • Egg wash (1 egg + a dash of milk / to brush over the pastry)

Notes* MULTIPLY recipes as needed

* The COOKING TEMPERATURE et TIME will depend on the exact recipes you’re making so cook according to the recipes you’re following. 🙂

How to make gluten free shortcrust pastry from scratch

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE CLASSIC SHORTCRUST PASTRY:

  1. Mix the flour, sugar and salt together in a bowl (as well as the xanthan gum, only if your flour blend doesn’t already contain it).
  2. Add the butter (cold, straight out of the fridge) and mix with your hands until you reach a crumb like texture.
  3. Add the egg and mix with a spoon until the dough starts to come together and then wet your hands slightly (to prevent sticking) and knead the dough until you reach a smooth ball.
  4. The pastry will be quite sticky and unmanageable at this point so wrap it up in cling film or store in a container and place in the freezer for 30 minutes to make it more solid.
  5. Take it out of the freezer, dust some flour over your work surface as well as on top of your pastry dough and carefully roll it out.
  6. Use according to the recipe you’re making.

FOR THE YOGHURT SHORTCRUST PASTRY:

  1. Just like the classic shortcrust pastry above, mix the dry ingredients together in a bowl, then add the butter (it needs to be cold, straight out of the fridge) and mix with your hands until you reach a crumb like texture.
  2. Then beat an egg in a separate bowl and carefully pour half in the pastry (keep the other half to use as egg wash later on).
  3. Add the yoghurt and stir with a spoon or spatula until the dough start to come together and then knead with your hands (slightly wet them first to prevent sticking) until you have a smooth dough ball.
  4. Note: if the dough is way too sticky and hard to manage, add more flour (just a tiny bit at a time) until you can form a sticky but manageable dough ball.
  5. Same as above, the pastry will still be too sticky to use at this point so wrap it up or place it in a container and freeze for about 30 minutes to make it more solid and manageable.
  6. Lightly flour your work surface and knead the chilled dough until smooth, then sprinkle some more flour on top and roll the pastry with a rolling pin.
  7. Use according to the recipe you’re making.

FOR THE COCONUT SHORTCRUST PASTRY:

  1. Mix the coconut flour, xanthan gum, sugar, salt and baking powder together in a bowl.
  2. Add cold butter (still solid, but preferably left to sit at room temperature for 10 minutes) and mix with your hands
  3. Add the 2 eggs and mix with your hands, kneading until you have a smooth dough ball.
  4. Then add one or two teaspoons of warm water and keep kneading the dough until smooth. It shouldn’t be overly sticky, but it also shouldn’t be so dry that the pastry is impossible to roll without cracking all over the place. Feel free to add more water (1 teaspoon at a time) if necessary.
  5. Lightly flour your work surface and sprinkle a bit on top of the dough as well to prevent sticking. Note: be careful not to put too much as it could make the dough too dry. If that happens, don’t worry, just add a tiny bit of water to the dough and restart.
  6. Carefully roll the dough as thin as possible and correct any cracks with your fingers as you go along (especially around the edges). Note: as I said above, if the dough is dry and unmanageable, this is a sign that you need to add more water.
  7. Use according to the recipe you’re making.

Hope you enjoy these!

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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IG: Paulamarienaranjo

FB: MarieNaranjo

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More great articles and recipes

‘They Go to Mommy First’

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

How the pandemic is disproportionately disrupting mothers’ careers.

Jessica Grose

By Jessica Grose

  • Published July 15, 2020 Updated July 16, 2020
Credit…Monica Garwood

Maggie Levine was on maternity leave from her job as a children’s librarian in Boston for the first few months of the pandemic, but she started working again in the middle of May. She and her husband, James Maher, an engineer, had no outside child care between mid-May and early July, while she was working from home and he was working part time from home and part time from the office. They were both caring for their baby, who is now 9 months old.

“I’m usually expected to do 35 hours a week, and I have been hitting, I would say, 10,” Levine said, “which would be a really generous way of thinking about the time I’m able to put in.”

When I asked Maher how many hours a week he worked in pre-pandemic times, compared to how many hours he works now: “My usual is around 40, and I’m probably hitting around 40,” he said.

Levine and Maher are representative of a nationwide trend. A pre-print of a study soon to be published in the academic journal Gender, Work & Organization showed that in heterosexual couples where both the mother and father were continuously employed and have children under 13, mothers “have reduced their work hours four to five times more than fathers.” This has exacerbated the gender gap in work hours by 20 to 50 percent, the study found.

William Scarborough, Ph.D., an assistant professor of sociology at the University of North Texas and a co-author of the study, said that he and his colleagues analyzed data from the Current Population Survey, because that data set followed the same group of families from February to April.

“It created this good empirical opportunity to see what mothers’ and fathers’ work hours were prior to the pandemic, and how they changed at the peak when schools and day cares across the country closed down,” Dr. Scarborough said.

While the parents examined in this study were not a nationally representative group — they are dual earning, straight married couples who tended to be middle or upper class, and many had jobs that could be done from home — the study’s findings were consistent with other research about who handles the majority of child care during the pandemic.

Syracuse University research brief examined data from the Census Household Pulse survey, conducted in late April and early May, and found that over 80 percent of U.S. adults who weren’t working because they had to care for their children who were not in school or day care were women.

Dr. Scarborough said that their study did not examine why women whose work circumstances were the same as their husbands were doing more of the child care. However, he said that his co-author, Caitlyn Collins, an assistant professor of sociology at Washington University, speculated that part of the issue may be that “when a child needs help, they go to mommy first,” and over days and weeks, that has a cumulative, undermining effect.

Nick Kahl, the dad of a 2-year-old in Portland, Ore., and a lawyer in private practice, said his son doesn’t interrupt him as much as he interrupts his wife, Jenny Smith, who is the communications director of a state agency.

Terri E. Givens, a mom of two boys in Menlo Park, Calif and the chief executive and founder of a company that provides career development for academic leaders, had another explanation for the gender disparity: Moms are the emotional barometers for the household, and they’re managing an unseen amount of extra work, thinking about child care, dentist appointments and the happiness of their children, even when men are making an effort. “My husband is one of the best you’ll find,” she said of her spouse, who is an engineer. “But it’s that emotional labor that’s really hard to quantify.”

Sandi Villarreal, the executive editor of Sojourners, a Christian social justice magazine, said that her husband, Michael Middaugh, a pastor of a Lutheran church in Silver Spring, Md., is doing the same amount, if not more, of the caretaking for their three children, ages 6, 4, and almost 1, because his schedule is more flexible than hers — for now.

“I don’t know what’s going to happen when church starts to reopen in August,” Villarreal said. Her husband will no longer be able to solely telecommute and he will have to go in for services. They have a nanny coming one day a week right now, but the situation is not sustainable.

“I think at some point it’s going to give,” Villareal said of their tenuous arrangement. “I think the hard part is there’s no end in sight

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

Paula M Naranjo

IG: Paulamarienaranjo

FB: MarieNaranjo

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GREEK CHICKEN SPINACH SALAD (PALEO, WHOLE30, KETO)

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By Julia – The Roasted Root

Herby Greek Chicken Salad with baked chicken, spinach, avocado, red onion,pine nuts, and an amazing Greek salad dressing. This fresh and flavorful dinner salad recipe is a filling, clean meal worthy of putting on repeat!

repeat!

Herby Greek Spinach Salad - paleo, whole30, keto

The bad news is…we must cook chicken. From a scientific standpoint, this does require heat.

I don’t make up the rules. Nor do I often follow them.

But the good news is (part two), the chicken is crazy tender and lovely, and can just as easily be grilled or baked…pick your passion!

AND the good news is (part three) this salad is CRAZY herby and will take you away on a mental vacation to the beautiful Mediterranean.

At first glance, this recipe appears to call for eleventy billion ingredients; however, you’ll notice many of them are herbs or spices for the salad dressing and the chicken marinade, many of which cross-over to both the dressing and the marinade. 

AND most of which you likely already have in your spice collection!

Don’t worry, the process is easy – it’s a 3-stepper.

We..

  1. Make the dressing
  2. Marinate and bake the chicken (okay, that’s two steps, but three always sounds more enticing than four).
  3. Assemble the salad.
Herby Greek Spinach Salad - paleo, whole30, keto

Here’s how this plays out in detail:

How to Make Greek Chicken Salad:

Begin by preparing the Greek salad dressing. To do so, add all ingredients to a small blender and blend until well-combined and creamy. Use immediately or store in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

 Place chicken in a sealable bag or container along with oil, lemon juice, herbs, and sea salt. Seal the bag and move everything around until well-coated. Marinate 15 minutes or up to 8 hours.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and place chicken in a casserole dish.

 Bake on the center rack of the preheated oven 25 to 30 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through.

Transfer chicken to a cutting board and allow it to rest 10 minutes before slicing. This allows the juices to distribute throughout the meat, yielding the most tender result.

 Chop the chicken into cubes. If you’re making the chicken in advance, I recommend refrigerating the chicken prior to chopping it. This way, your chicken stays nice and moist and tender AND you end up with a completely chilled salad. salad).

Divide the spinach, cherry tomatoes, red onion, cucumber, avocado, and pine nuts among 4 large salad bowls. Top with herby roast chicken and Greek salad dressing. Enjoy!

As an alternative, you can add all of the salad ingredients to a large mixing bowl and drizzle in the dressing to toss it before serving. 

Herby Greek Spinach Salad - paleo, whole30, keto

GREEK CHICKEN SPINACH SALAD 

COURSE: MAIN COURSE, SALAD 

CUISINE: AMERICAN, GREEK, MEDITERRANEAN

 KEYWORD: BAKED CHICKEN, KETO, LOW-CARB, PALEO, SPINACH SALAD, WHOLE30 

PREP TIME: 20 MINUTES COOK TIME: 40 MINUTES

 SERVINGS: 4 PEOPLE AUTHOR: JULIA

Clean, refreshing Greek Spinach Salad with herby baked chicken and Greek vinaigrette

INGREDIENTS

GREEK VINAIGRETTE:

BAKED CHICKEN:

  • 1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 Tbsp avocado oil or olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp dried parsley
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt

SPINACH SALAD:

  • 5 ounces baby spinach
  • 1/3 cup red onion thinly sliced
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1/2 cucumber thinly sliced
  • 1 avocado sliced
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts toasted

INSTRUCTIONS

MAKE THE DRESSING:

  1. Add all ingredients to a small blender and blend until well-combined and creamy. Use immediately or store in a sealed jar in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

BAKE THE CHICKEN:

  1. Place chicken in a sealable bag or container along with oil, lemon juice, herbs, and sea salt. Seal the bag and move everything around until well-coated. Marinate 15 minutes or up to 8 hours.
  2. When you’re ready to bake the chicken, preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and place chicken in a casserole dish.
  3. Bake on the center rack of the preheated oven 25 to 30 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through.
  4. Transfer chicken to a cutting board and allow it to rest 10 minutes before slicing. This allows the juices to distribute throughout the meat, yielding the most tender result.
  5. Chop the chicken into cubes (Note: you can refrigerate the chicken prior to chopping if you prefer chilled chicken in your salad).

MAKE THE SALAD:

DIVIDE THE SPINACH, CHERRY TOMATOES, RED ONION, CUCUMBER, AVOCADO, AND PINE NUTS AMONG 4 LARGE SALAD BOWLS. TOP WITH HERBY ROAST CHICKEN AND ENJOY!

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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HEALTHY NO BAKE SUGAR COOKIE BARS (PALEO, VEGAN, GLUTEN FREE)

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By Arman Liew

These healthy no bake sugar cookie bars are soft, chewy and loaded with holiday flavor but completely guilt-free- Even the protein packed frosting! Made with no butter, oil, flour or granulated sugar, these no bake sugar cookie bars are naturally gluten free, vegan, paleo, keto and low carb- They are also sugar free!

Two healthy no bake sugar bars topped with a protein cream cheese frosting.

Keto Low Carb Sugar Cookie Bars

Welcome to the biggest oxymoron of the century.

A sugar cookie inspired recipe without any refined sugar.

Wham. 

Bam.

Thank you, Ma’am. 

Can we talk sugar cookies for a minute? Okay, good.

Growing up, during the holiday months, my sister and I would occasionally be gifted sugar cookies. Those days, they were delicious, plain cookies with a disgraceful hard artificial frosting…in pink. On the other hand, we had Niki who LOVED the pink frosting (with sprinkles!) but hated the cookie part.

In one of the rarest of occasions ever, we shared. I would eat the bottom cookie part and she would eat the frosting. It was a gloriously disgraceful sight. 

Healthy Paleo Vegan Sugar Cookie Bars

Eventually, the sugar cookie phase left, mainly because my mum thought what my sister and I did was repulsive. She suggested I eat plain cookies instead (I recall she pointed to the fruit bowl…) and she told Niki that the tooth fairy had gone on vacation. 

I think that scarred Niki for life. 

If you’ve been a long-term reader here, you know that we don’t do things the standard way here. As such, I’ve taken all the best bits of a sugar cookie and given it a healthy (NO) bake-over!

My intentions with today’s recipe is to combine the best parts of a sugar cookie but give it a healthy makeover. As always, it has to taste pretty similar and just as easy to whip up! 

A stack of healthy no bake sugar cookie bars topped with a cream cheese dairy free frosting.

Let’s compare the two…

A traditional sugar cookie- Soft and chewy vanilla flavored cookie with a hardened frosting with sprinkles. They are usually made with butter, flour, oil, MULTIPLE sources of sugar and an overly processed icing.

My sugar cookie twist? A delicious soft and chewy ‘sugar’ cookie base which requires to baking whatsoever, coupled with a thick vanilla cookie frosting which is completely healthy and packed with protein. My ingredients? Let’s just say its a full 180 from what its traditional counterparts have!

Oh, and even though they are called ‘sugar’ cookies, there isn’t an inch of the granulated white stuff in this.

Promise. 

Instead, we use monk fruit sweetened maple syrup and granulated monk fruit for the sweetness- Both of these are super low carb and 100% sugar-free- they are also keto-friendly and vegan!

A stack of 3 healthy no bake sugar cookie bars.

These healthy no bake sugar cookie bars have a thick, soft and chewy base, topped with a creamy protein packed frosting- They may look sinful but they are completely guilt-free! These sugar cookie bars are the perfect healthy twist on traditional holiday, Christmas, and festive treats, and make the perfect snack, dessert or anytime treat! Unlike traditional sugar cookies, these contain no butter, no oil, no grains, granulated sugar or any nasties- Although you’d never be able to tell!

I thank the use of coconut flour and smart swaps in the cookie base for achieving this! Bonus? They don’t even need an oven- A simple one bowl recipe with barely any time needed from prep to plate! Depending on which option you choose Depending on which option you choose (and which frosting you use- This one is the vanilla protein frosting), this recipe is completely paleo, vegan, gluten free, sugar free, keto, dairy free and grain free! 

It’s the ultimate keto and vegan holiday dessert, perfect for Christmas, Thanksgiving or anytime really!

Three healthy no bake sugar cookie bars topped with a dairy-free frosting and sprinkles

For the frosting, the one pictured here is using a protein frosting (check out this page for my tried and tested favorites), but for those who want a non-protein option, check out the coconut cream based alternatives! Or well, you could just frost it any way you like….

HACK! For those of you with nut allergies, I’d recommend swapping out the nut butter with either a sweetened sunflower seed butter or a soy nut butter. Using tahini or an unsweetened nut butter alternative leaves it a little bitter and oily. 

Make these healthy no bake sugar cookie bars minus the sugar part (hello, oxymoron) and enjoy these on your own.

No artificial hardened frosting here. 

Healthy No Bake Paleo Vegan Sugar Cookie Bars

Healthy No Bake Sugar Cookie Bars

No Bake Sugar Cookie Bars

Healthy No Bake Sugar Cookie Bars (Keto, Low Carb, Paleo, Vegan)

These healthy no bake sugar cookie bars are soft, chewy and loaded with holiday flavor but completely guilt-free- Vegan, paleo, keto, sugar-free, low carb, dairy free.

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Keyword: low carb dessert, no bake dessert, sugar cookie bars

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Servings: 12 servings

Calories: 149 kcal

Author: Arman

Ingredients

For the sugar cookie base

For the protein frosting

For the coconut butter frosting

Instructions

For the sugar cookie base

  • Line an 8 x 8 inch baking pan with tin foil and set aside.
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine your flours, protein powder, cinnamon and granulated sweetener and set aside.
  • In a microwave safe bowl or stovetop, melt your cashew butter with the sticky sweetener of choice. Whisk in the vanilla extract and optional butter extract and pour into the dry mixture. Mix very well until fully incorporated. Using a tablespoon, add milk of choice until a very thick batter is formed.
  • Pour batter in the lined baking pan and press firmly in place. Sprinkle with the 1/2 teaspoon of granulated sweetener and optional sprinkles and refrigerate for at least 10 minutes, or until firm. Once firm, add frosting of choice and refrigerate for another 30 minutes to firm up before slicing.

To make frosting(s)

  • Combine all ingredients and use milk of choice to thin out until a very thick frosting is formed.

Notes

No bake sugar cookie bars should be kept refrigerated but can be frozen too.These would be perfect to wrap individually and gift to others for a healthy holiday treat!

Nutrition

Serving: 1Bar | Calories: 149kcal | Carbohydrates: 10g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 5g | Fiber: 6g | Vitamin A: 200IU | Vitamin C: 1.7mg | Calcium: 20mg | Iron: 0.7mg | NET CARBS: 4g

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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IG: Paulamarienaranjo

FB: MarieNaranjo

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INSTANT POT BUTTER CHICKEN

Paula M Naranjo/ Parent Editor

 By Alida Ryder | July 10, 2020

Instant Pot Butter Chicken

INGREDIENTS

  • Chicken. I prefer using boneless, skinless chicken thighs but breast can also be used.
  • Butter + Vegetable oil. 
  • Fresh garlic. 
  • Fresh ginger.
  • Spices: I prefer using a combination of Garam Masala, paprika, cardamom and coriander. You can however use any curry powder/blend that you have or like.
  • Tomatoes. I used tomato puree (not paste). Passata can also work. Chopped tomatoes are also fine but I prefer the rich, smoothness the puree adds.
  • Chicken stock. 
  • Cream. Heavy / Whipping.
  • Sugar. Optional, but I like the way it mellows the acidity of the tomatoes.
  • Salt and pepper. 
How to make butter chicken in an Instant Pot.
Instant Pot Butter Chicken.

HOW TO MAKE BUTTER CHICKEN IN AN INSTANT POT

  1. Marinate the chicken: This step is optional but it can be done up to 24 hours ahead of time. Combine the chicken with oil and half of the spices. Cover and allow to marinade for 10 minutes or up to 24 hours in the fridge.
  2. Cook the curry: Set the Instant Pot to sauté function. Add the butter and a tablespoon of oil. Allow to melt together then add the ginger and garlic. Cook for a minute until fragrant then add the remaining spices. Cook for a few seconds then add the chicken, tomato puree, stock, sugar, salt and pepper. Place the lid on and turn to sealing position. Cook the curry on the meat function for 6 minutes. Quick-release the pressure.
  3. Finish and serve: Remove the lid and set back to the sauté function. Pour in the cream and allow to simmer for 10 minutes until the sauce has reduced slightly. Season to taste then serve with fresh coriander / cilantro over steamed rice.
Butter chicken with rice and roti.

Instant Pot Butter Chicken

This Instant Pot butter chicken recipe is an easy, delicious dinner recipe. The aromatic sauce and juicy chicken is perfection serve with steamed rice.

Course: Dinner

Cuisine: Indian

Keyword: butter chicken, Butter chicken recipe, Instant Pot Butter Chicken Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Marinating time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

 Servings: 6 Calories: 419 kcal 

Author: Alida Ryder

Ingredients

For the marinated chicken

  • 750 g (1½lbs) chicken thighs boneless + skinless
  • 2 tbsp canola oil / vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp Garam Masala
  • ½ tsp ground cardamom
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp salt

For the butter chicken

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 2 tsp garlic crushed
  • 1 tsp ginger crushed
  • 2 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cardamom
  • 400 g (14oz) Tomato puree (not paste) Passata or crushed tomatoes are good substitutes
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1-2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1½ cups heavy / whipping cream

To serve

  • Steamed rice
  • Fresh coriander / Cilantro

Instructions

  • Combine the chicken with oil and the spices. Cover and allow to marinade for 10 minutes or up to 24 hours in the fridge.
  • Set the Instant Pot to sauté function. Add the butter and a tablespoon of oil. Allow to melt together then add the ginger and garlic.
  • Cook for a minute until fragrant then add the remaining spices. Cook for a few seconds then add the chicken, tomato puree, stock, sugar, salt and pepper.
  • Place the lid on and turn to sealing position. Cook the curry on the meat function for 6 minutes. Quick-release the pressure.
  • Remove the lid and set back to the sauté function. Pour in the cream and allow to simmer for 10 minutes until the sauce has reduced slightly.
  • Season to taste then serve with fresh coriander / cilantro over steamed rice.

Directions for cooking without Instant Pot

  • Marinate the chicken according to above directions.
  • Heat a large pot over medium heat and saute the ginger and garlic with the spices for a few seconds. Add the marinated chicken, tomatoes and stock. Season with salt, pepper and sugar.
  • Cover and allow to simmer for 20-30 minutes until the chicken is cooked and tender.
  • Remove the lid, pour in the cream and cook for another 10 minutes until the sauce has reduced.
  • Season and serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 419kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 27g | Fat: 29g | Saturated Fat: 14g | Cholesterol: 185mg | Sodium: 928mg | Potassium: 666mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 1258IU | Vitamin C: 8mg | Calcium: 66mg | Iron: 3mg

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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Parenting Tips: How to prevent your toddlers from choking?

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

Choking is one of the biggest problems amongst babies and toddlers. So, how can you protect them from this? Here are some prevention tips to save your little one from choking.

Written By Deblina Chatterjee  Mumbai  Updated: July 10, 2020 02:14 PM  

Parenting Tips: How to prevent your toddlers from choking?

Parents mostly get paranoid when their babies become toddlers. This is the time when they start to crawl or walk and most importantly, they try to put everything in their mouth. This is one of the most important things and there are many risks associated with this as well. While eating solid foods or putting anything in the mouth, they may choke.

So, parents have to be careful always to prevent their little ones from choking. Babies tend to choke when their airway gets blocked and any kind of small things can cause this blockage on the wind-pipe which will lead to choking. So, here are some tips to prevent your kids from choking.Advertisement

Choking amongst toddlers and tips to prevent it:

Things that cause choking

These are the things that can cause choking amongst toddlers:

Lollipops.

Meat pieces.

Nuts.

Raw carrots.

Uncooked peas.

Grapes.

Coins.

Small batteries.Advertisement

Pen caps.

Marbles.

Certain parts of plastic toys.

Any small items.

Prevention tips for choking

These are things to take care of while feeding your baby:

1-   Make them sit while feeding. If your child is eating while lying down or playing or running around, then there are more risks for them to get choked.

2-   While eating, encourage them to chew the food properly. This will be easy for them to swallow it without getting choked.

3-   Keep food pieces small while feeding them and give them food in small portions.

4-   Apples, carrots, etc. can be hard for them to chew. So, cook them properly before feeding. You can also mash certain foods to make it easy for them to swallow.

5-   Start giving them whole nuts from the age of five. Grapes, lollies are also at higher risks for them for choking.

6-   You cannot keep a strict eye on your kids every time. Hence, you need to keep all kinds of small objects away from their reach.7-   If your toddler has older siblings, then tell them to keep their toys in a separate place so that toddlers cannot get them.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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This Isn’t Sustainable for Working Parents

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

The pandemic has already taken a toll on the careers of those with young children—particularly mothers.

JOE PINSKER JULY 9, 2020

MOISES SAMAN / MAGNUM

Child care is the immovable object around which so much else in family life orbits, and when the usual child-care options disappear, something else has to give. During the pandemic, with schools and day-care centers closed or operating at reduced capacity, many parents’ careers—particularly mothers’ careers—are getting deprioritized.

When Salpy Kabaklian-Slentz left her job in April because her family was moving to Southern California, she thought she’d be able to devote her days to job searching and then start working again soon enough. Three months later, she’s struggled to find any open positions similar to the one she gave up, as a local-government attorney.

Her main task these days is looking after her and her husband’s boys, two “bundles of energy” ages 6 and 4. Kabaklian-Slentz’s husband, also a lawyer, has mostly been going into the office, but when he works from home, he’s protective of his time. “He’s not only locked the office door but barricaded the sofa in front of it to get stuff done,” she told me. “Otherwise the kids pop in every two seconds.”

Instead they go to her, preventing her from getting the sort of uninterrupted time that a job search, as a well as a job itself, demands. She doesn’t yet know how or when schools in her area will reopen, and thus whether she’d even be free to start a new job in the fall, if an opportunity were to open up. “It sucks,” she said. “Being a stay-at-home parent was never on the radar for me.” It wasn’t on the radar for many other parents of young children either, and yet here they are, even those in households with lots of resources, leaving their jobs or reducing their hours.

Francine Blau, an economist at Cornell University, says that working mothers are especially vulnerable to professional setbacks right now, for two reasons. First, before the pandemic, women on average spent twice as much time as men caring for other members of their household, according to government time-use data. That means that as families have had to figure out new child-care arrangements during the pandemic, many women have, by cultural default, spent more time looking after their kids, which affects their ability to work.

Second, “if it becomes difficult for both parents to give work the same amount of attention that they would have under normal circumstances, it makes economic sense in many households to prioritize the husband’s career,” Blau told me, given that men are much more likely to be the higher earner in straight couples. “If we have to do a triage, in many cases it’ll be the wife’s career that suffers.”

Of course, this isn’t always the case. Daniel Olmstead, a 43-year-old in Petaluma, California, has lately been in charge of child care, homeschooling, shopping, cooking, and other tasks in his household while his wife works from home—she has a steady income, while he’s been looking to start a career in a new field after finishing a data-science graduate program last year. “It feels like being trapped: Time is limited, something has to be sacrificed, and the rational candidate is clearly my nascent career,” he told me in an email.

During the past few months, looking after the kids, mixed with short bouts of networking and working on his professional portfolio, has worn Olmstead down; he said he hasn’t been able to sleep through the night, and sometimes gets anxiety-induced eye twitches and headaches. And this is a household in which one parent is able to work from home and keep the family financially afloat. Parents who are only able to work in person and don’t have a partner who can afford to be a full-time stay-at-home parent are likely even more overwhelmed.

Workers who can’t manage both their job and child care are left with some unpleasant choices. Dana Sumpter and Mona Zanhour, both business professors at California State University at Long Beach, have been interviewing working mothers about their experiences during the pandemic. Their research is in its early stages, but Sumpter told me that so far they’ve heard more women talk about the possibility of reducing their hours than leaving their job entirely.

That’s at least better than the alternative. “It is difficult to reenter the workplace once someone has left it,” Sumpter said. “A career hiatus can impact one’s career trajectory, not to mention lifetime earnings, [and] it also affects women’s identity, self-esteem, and well-being.” Reducing one’s schedule to part-time, though, can also come at a high cost, because many white-collar employers disproportionately compensate those who can work longer hours.

Even working mothers who haven’t switched to part-time or temporarily left their job can feel like they’re falling behind professionally during the pandemic. Annie McMahon Whitlock, a professor living in Clarkston, Michigan, spent much of the spring semester working and parenting in three-hour shifts, alternating with her husband. She told me that writing up her research was “very slow going” during those stressed-out three-hour periods.

Falling behind on her writing was frustrating too, as she saw some men in her field become “super productive” with their own output. “I look at them and go, ‘When did they have the time to do all this writing?’” Whitlock said. “If you have to work on the child-care aspect, you’re not going to be able to get those book contracts [and] get those articles out, so you might not get promoted.” Before the pandemic, she said, she knew women at other universities who would rather lie about being sick than tell their co-workers that they were taking a day off to care for their sick child, and she worries that academia has only become less hospitable to working mothers in the past few months.

This is a concern that Melissa Mazmanian, a co-author of Dreams of the Overworked: Living, Working, and Parenting in the Digital Age, raised when I interviewed her last month. During the pandemic, working parents with young children “are fundamentally not going to be able to be as productive as someone who’s been on their computer for eight hours at home with grown kids or without kids,” she told me. “Who’s going to get promoted two years from now? Or who’s going to lose their job two months from now?”

Indeed, Whitlock has observed, based on her and her friends’ experiences, that any initial concern for the needs of working parents has tapered off. “People were very understanding in March and April that people had kids at home,” she said. “We’re getting into July, and in general people are sort of over it … [During conversations about] reopening, everyone’s saying we can all work remotely still, [but that ignores] the fact that that’s the same thing we were doing in March, and that was really hard.”

Are any working parents not having a hard time? Kabaklian-Slentz said that some she knows seem to be faring all right—one is a mother who used to travel a lot for work, and who has been enjoying the time at home—but “everybody else is either not working or has been pulling their hair out.”

One of the exceptions she mentioned stuck out. It was a couple who had already been considering, before the pandemic, relocating their family to New Zealand, and who are now going through with the move, in part because they expect that their daughters will be able to safely go to school there. They’ve settled on what can seem like the only solution to the problem that’s making the lives of so many American working parents worse: Leave the country.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

Paula M Naranjo

IG: Paulamarienaranjo

FB: MarieNaranjo

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