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Welcome to Exposure Magazine

Hugh Downs, anchor of ’20/20′ and ‘Today,’ dead at 99

Cedric Nettles/Senior Editor

Los Angeles (CNN Business)Hugh Downs, the versatile and Emmy-winning broadcaster whose decades-long TV career ranged from anchoring ABC News’ “20/20” to the “Today” show to serving as Jack Paar’s sidekick on “The Tonight Show,” has died at his home in Scottsdale, Arizona. He was 99.Local outlet AZFamily was first to report the news of Downs’ passing, citing a statement from his great-niece, Molly Shaheen.Downs — who retired in 1999 — was essentially there for the very start of commercial television, serving as the announcer for the children’s show “Kukla, Fran and Ollie” and comedy legend Sid Caesar’s “Caesar’s Hour” in the 1950s.In 1957, when Paar succeeded Steve Allen as host of “The Tonight Show,” Downs became the announcer. The next year, Downs launched his run as the original host of the game show “Concentration.”

At “Today,” Downs famously championed the career of Barbara Walters, advocating that the young writer-producer be given an opportunity on camera. The two later teamed up on a syndicated program in the mid-1970s, “Not for Women Only,” before they were later reunited on “20/20.” Downs was not involved with the development and launch of “20/20” in 1978, recalling in an interview with the Television Academy’s Archives of American Television that the premiere was “hideously disastrous” and pummeled by critics. After the first episode, ABC News president Roone Arledge asked Downs to take over as an anchor to fix the show. Downs said that he had wanted to do a show like “60 Minutes,” and the opportunity “fell out of the sky on me.” “’60 Minutes’ created the atmosphere that allowed us to flourish as a competing newsmagazine,” Downs said. Walters joined the program the year after its debut and became Downs’ co-host in 1984. Downs — with his baritone voice and soothing manner — remained with the program until his retirement.Downs won a pair of Emmy awards, for the program “Live From Lincoln Center” and hosting the PBS talk program “Over Easy,” which premiered in 1977 and was aimed at older viewers.Born in Akron, Ohio, Downs began working in radio after college — a stint interrupted by his service during World War II — before landing at NBC-owned WMAQ in Chicago, where he worked in various capacities for several years before moving to New York.Guinness World Records once recognized Downs for having appeared in more hours of U.S. television (roughly 10,000) than anyone else, a record later broken by Regis Philbin.Downs’ wife, Ruth Shaheen Downs, died in 2017 at the age of 95. The two had been married since 1944.

Honey Garlic Glazed Salmon

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

by LENA ABRAHAM JAN 14, 2020
Honey Garlic Glazed Salmon Vertical
ETHAN CALABRESE

Searing fish might seem intimidating, but once you get the hang of it, it’ll be second nature! It’s important that you get your pan hot and the bottom of your pan thoroughly coated in oil. Place your filets skin side-up — you should hear a sizzle. Let the fillets cook, undisturbed, for a few minutes. (That’s how you get that delicious crust!) Gently lift a corner of one fillet with a spatula. If it releases easily, it’s ready to go. If not, give it a little more time. Flip, cook a few more minutes to get the skin crisp and the fish cooked through, and you’re good to go! 

Now that you’re a sear master, try your hand at some of our favorite fish recipes.

YIELDS:4

PREP TIME: 0 HOURS 5 MINS

TOTAL TIME: 0 HOURS 20 MINS

INGREDIENTS:

1/3 c. honey

1/4 c. soy sauce

2 tbsp. lemon juice

1 tsp. red pepper flakes

3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided

4-6-oz. salmon fillets, patted dry with a paper towel

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 lemon, sliced into rounds

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together honey, soy sauce, lemon juice and red pepper flakes.
  2. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat two tablespoons oil. When oil is hot but not smoking, add salmon skin-side up and season with salt and pepper. Cook salmon until deeply golden, about 6 minutes, then flip over and add remaining tablespoon of oil.
  3. Add garlic to the skillet and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the honey mixture and sliced lemons and cook until sauce is reduced by about 1/3. Baste salmon with the sauce.
  4. Garnish with sliced lemon and serve.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

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Having Disturbing Thoughts as a New Parent? Here’s How to Cope

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By Juli Fraga and Karen Kleiman

Intrusive thoughts can be terrifying. Exercises, like distancing, can reduce parents’ anxieties.

Credit…Helen Li

Soon after her first baby was born in 2014, Crystal McAuley started having catastrophic thoughts about her infant’s health. Throughout the day, random thoughts popped up like tiny speech balloons, each one filled with a newfound fear: “What if the baby overheats?” “What if he stops breathing?”

McAuley, 38, shared her concerns with her husband, who told her the baby was healthy. His reassurance, however, didn’t shut down the worry-filled thoughts that looped over and over in her mind. “It was hard to make them stop,” McAuley recalled. And then they changed course: “I started having visions of pulling my car into the opposite lane of traffic, but I didn’t want to die or harm my infant.” 

McAuley was experiencing intrusive thoughts, which are unwelcome, negative thoughts, or images that seem to come out of nowhere and are highly upsettingpsychologists say.

“Occasionally, everyone experiences senseless intrusive thoughts,” said Jonathan Abramowitz, Ph.D., a professor of clinical psychology and an anxiety researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. On a turbulent flight, for example, we may see images of the plane crashing, even if we’re not afraid of flying. If we’re driving a friend’s new car, we may have thoughts about getting into an accident.

Most times, we don’t give those thoughts much attention, but when stress arises and responsibilities mount, it can be harder to ignore them, Dr. Abramowitz explained. And with the added strain of the Covid-19 pandemic, many parents are preoccupied with worries about their children becoming ill and dying from the virus, he said.

McAuley said the pandemic has sent her anxiety into a tailspin. “I feel like a new mom again. At unpredictable times, I imagine one of my children falling down a steep ravine or dying in a violent accident.”

While intrusive thoughts can be a sign of a perinatal mood disorder, such as postpartum anxiety or postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder, a 2006 study conducted by Dr. Abramowitz and his colleagues followed 85 participants (43 mothers and 42 fathers) from the second trimester of pregnancy to three months postpartum. Of those who participated in the study, 91 percent of mothers and 88 percent of fathers experienced upsetting intrusive thoughts about their newborn.

According to Dr. Abramowitz, it’s not uncommon for new parents to think of the baby falling down the stairs, choking or drowning in the bathtub. One parent told Dr. Abramowitz he imagined “sticking a pencil in the soft spot of his baby’s head.” 

Disturbing thoughts and images like these can bewilder new parents. Not to mention, mothers who envision harming their babies may misinterpret their thoughts as ominous signs about their mothering abilities. “I felt like a prisoner inside my own mind,” said McAuley, who worried that if she told her doctor what she was thinking, her baby would be taken away.

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While intrusive thoughts can be terrifying, the problem lies in how we interpret them, Dr. Abramowitz said. Labeling such notions as “negative” causes the brain to give them more weight, which is why parents who judge their invasive thoughts often struggle to let them go.

Dr. Abramowitz and his colleague, Nichole Fairbrother, Ph.D., a psychologist and researcher at the University of British Columbia, said intrusive thoughts pop up in new parenthood for a reason. In their research, the psychologists found that the immense responsibility parents feel for keeping their newborns alive can bring on disturbing thoughts about harm striking their babies, especially during the first six months of their children’s lives.

Dr. Fairbrother said: “I remember gazing at my baby’s delicate hands and thinking, ‘I could just cut those right off with the garden clippers,’ but because I’m an anxiety researcher, I wasn’t upset by it.”

Even though intrusive thoughts might seem puzzling, Dr. Fairbrother said, they’re often adaptive. “If a mother worries about the stroller rolling into traffic, she’s going to grip the handle more tightly,” she explained.

For parents bothered by their intrusive thoughts, certain exercises and steps can reduce the anxiety they create. A few suggestions:

One way to disarm intrusive thoughts is to recognize that they don’t define who you are. Repeating the bothersome thought in a singsong voice or saying it aloud, over and over again can help, said Stefan Hofmann, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and anxiety researcher at Boston University. This behavioral technique, known as distancing, can unhook thoughts from emotions, helping the mind to change direction. No longer seeing the thoughts as a threat, parents begin to realize that “thoughts are nothing more than just thoughts,” Dr. Hofmann explained.

“A mother may think about pushing the stroller down the stairs, but that doesn’t mean she’ll act on it,” he said.

Trying to ignore intrusive thoughts and upsetting feelings only makes them louder. Carla Naumburg, Ph.D., a clinical social worker and parent coach, said acknowledge intrusive thoughts by practicing a mindfulness exercise called noticing, which is paying attention, without judgment to our thoughts and feelings as they arise.

Notice them by telling yourself, “There’s that thought again. Isn’t it interesting?” or “Look at that worry popping up. I know that one,” Dr. Naumburg suggested. Practicing this technique can help turn intrusive thoughts into something to be curious about, instead of something to fear.

Because of shame and stigma, parents may hide their intrusive thoughts, even from trusted friends. But empathic loved ones can help, said Pooja Lakshmin, M.D., a perinatal psychiatrist and clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at the George Washington University School of Medicine.

2017 study found that positive peer support can help bolster maternal competence, which can ease the transition to motherhood. “Social support can normalize and validate that all parents experience intrusive thoughts, which can take the sting out of parental shame,” Dr. Lakshmin shared.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, many in-person support groups for new parents aren’t taking place. However, online groups can help new mothers connect with their peers. Postpartum Support International provides a list of online support groups for expectant and new parents.

For a select number of mothers, intrusive thoughts speed up, coming on like tidal waves throughout the day. “The thoughts felt like an impulse I couldn’t control,” McAuley said. She tried to ease her worries by hovering over her infant, looking out for any sign of distress. When he was asleep, she checked on him at least 20 times each night just to make sure he was breathing.

Behaviors like these can be a sign of Postpartum Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, a maternal mental illness characterized by compulsive behaviors such as excessive cleaning, repetitive hand washing or checking on the baby repeatedly.

Mothers who suffer from postpartum depression, or PPD, and postpartum anxiety, or PPA, can also experience intrusive thoughts, said Samantha Meltzer-Brody, M.D., a professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While symptoms of OCD and PPD can overlap, Dr. Meltzer-Brody said frequent, severe and persistent thoughts are often a sign of OCD.

For some mothers, the pandemic worsens their fears. “Mothers may be focused on contamination or exposure to Covid,” Dr. Meltzer Brody explained. While most new mothers share those concerns, women with severe intrusive thoughts can’t put their worries about the coronavirus to rest. “For these moms, the thoughts are persistent and disabling,” she said.

Dr. Lakshmin said when unrelenting scary thoughts interfere with a mother’s ability to care for herself or her baby than the mother should seek professional help, which can include psychotherapy, group support and medication, when necessary.

When her son was 9 months old, McAuley became pregnant again. With her husband’s encouragement, she told her obstetrician about the anxiety and cascade of frightening images that wouldn’t stop. She was referred to a psychiatrist who diagnosed her with postpartum anxiety.

Receiving the diagnosis, she said, helped her recognize that she wasn’t alone. “My therapist normalized my thoughts and feelings, which helped me realize anxiety wasn’t a never-ending trap, but something I could learn to cope with.”

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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What Is Turmeric Lemonade And How It Helps Fight Depression

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By m.timesofindia.com | Last updated on – Jun 17, 2020, 11:50 IST

1/5​ What is Turmeric Lemonade

At a time, when stress and anxiety have become a part of our lifestyle, there is a lot of discussion about depression and loneliness. While we all are looking for ways to handle it effectively, it is also important to balance our daily lifestyle and avoid everything that can spike the levels of stress and anxiety. From watching food habits to social media consumption there are many things that need to be regulated. This piece of information talks about a simple and effective homemade drink called ‘Turmeric Lemonade’ which can actually make it a smooth ride. Read below to know about it.

2/5 ​How to make Turmeric Lemonade?

First of all squeeze juice of two lemons and 1 orange and mix them together in a glass jar along with 4 cups of soda water. Next, add a teaspoon of turmeric and mix until well blended. Add honey as per your taste and stir again. Lock the glass jar and keep in a cool place. Pour in a glass, add some ice and enjoy.

3/5 ​Expert’s take

According to Tanya S Kapoor, nutritionist, Wellness by Tanya, “Turmeric is known for balancing mood swings. In times of stress, if consumed daily it reflects positive impact on mental health. This spice works as a strong antidepressant; hence, one must regularly consume it in curries, salads or in any form making it a part of daily consumption.” She affirms, “When turmeric is combined with lemon it works wonders. And the best way to do so is to indulge in Turmeric Lemonade.” “It is suggested to take it daily during the first half of the day or with breakfast to have maximum benefits, as one tends to set a base for the body to absorb the right nutrients and feel good throughout the day,” she concludes.

4/5 Benefits of turmeric

According to a study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research, consumption of turmeric offers positive effects on depression as fluoxetine, the active ingredient in the psychiatric drug Prozac. The best part of consuming turmeric is, it has no side effects. Also, curcumin present in turmeric increases the levels of BDNF protein in the brain, which helps in sharpening thinking, learning and memory. It also helps in regulating neurotransmitters in the brain, which further improves sleep, appetite and positive mood.

5/5 ​Lemon helps regulate mood

Rich in vitamin C, it helps strengthen physical and mental well being in adverse situations. It has been proven that vitamins help reduce the levels of stress hormones ‘cortisol’ in the human body.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

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San Antonio’s downtown Christopher Columbus statue comes down

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By Joshua Fechter Updated 4:22 pm CDT, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

  • Workers remove the defaced statue of Christopher Columbus, on Wednesday , July 1, 2020. Photo: Bob Owen, San Antonio Express-News / San Antonio Express-News

Photo: Bob Owen, San Antonio Express-News. Workers remove the defaced statue of Christopher Columbus, on Wednesday , July 1, 2020.

A statue of Christopher Columbus — heralded for more than 500 years as the explorer who “discovered” the Americas — is no longer standing in a downtown San Antonio park.

  • <p>The Christopher Columbus statue located in the Piazza Di Columbo, also called Columbus Park was vandalized with red paint on June 25. The City Council in August will consider a proposal by Councilman Robert</p>“></li></ul>



<p style=Photo: Kin Man Hui /Staff Photographer

    The Christopher Columbus statue located in the Piazza Di Columbo, also called Columbus Park was vandalized with red paint on June 25. The City Council in August will consider a proposal by Councilman Robert Trevino to give it back to the Christopher Columbus Society, which donated it in 1957, and to rename the park.

    Crews hauled the statue from Columbus Park Wednesday morning on a flatbed truck rented from Home Depot in a calm ceremony.

    Columbus was long credited with discovering the “New World.” But in the past two decades, he has been widely re-assessed as a violent colonizer who slaughtered indigenous people.

    The removal of the statue, originally donated by the Christopher Columbus Italian Society, was accelerated in the wake of protests over the killing of George Floyd while in the custody of Minneapolis police as similar statues in other cities were scrutinized or destroyed.

    • <p>Demonstrators watch as San Antonio police stand guard around the Christopher Columbus statue after a demonstration in the park Saturday afternoon.</p>“></li></ul>



<p style=Photo: Robin Jerstad, San Antonio Express-News

      Demonstrators watch as San Antonio police stand guard around the Christopher Columbus statue after a demonstration in the park Saturday afternoon.

      In an attempt to prevent that outcome, District 1 Councilman Roberto Treviño and the Italian society struck a deal — to be voted on by City Council in August — to remove the statue of the explorer from Columbus Park, return the statue to the society and rename the park “Piazza Italia Park.”

      “We wanted to avoid something getting out of control,” said Paolo Cristadoro, who serves on the society’s board.

      We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

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Vegan Ice Cream

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

Photograph of Jeanine Donofrio and Jack Mathews in their kitchen

Author: Jeanine and Jack Donofrio

Say hello to the BEST vegan ice cream recipe! Made with just 3 ingredients, it’s super creamy, smooth, rich, delicious, and easy to make.

Vegan ice cream

Meet the BEST vegan ice cream. Ever.

Yep, I said it. Over the years, I’ve tried all sorts of vegan ice cream recipes, ones with bases ranging from frozen bananas to cashew milk to almond milk. For me, there’s no contest. As far as dairy-free ice cream goes, coconut ice cream is by far the best. Full-fat coconut milk adds enough richness to create a texture that is super creamy, smooth, and not at all icy. It’s rich, decadent, and every bit as good as the real thing.

Coconut milk, maple syrup, and tahini in bowls

Best Vegan Ice Cream Recipe Ingredients

Lately, this vegan ice cream recipe has become my new favorite. To make it, you’ll need three simple ingredients:

1. Coconut milk – My go-to base for dairy-free ice cream.
2. Maple syrup – It gives this recipe a deep, complex sweetness. I love the maple flavor here!
3. And…tahini! The creamy star ingredient in this recipe.

I know, I know. If you walk into any American ice cream shop, tahini probably wouldn’t be among the ice cream flavors there. However, sesame ice cream is popular in Japan. During our trip to Tokyo last spring, I had the most incredible sesame ice cream, and I haven’t stopped thinking about it.

Luckily for me, this homemade version is just as good as the delicious ice cream I had on our trip. The toasty, nutty flavor of the tahini pairs wonderfully with the maple syrup and coconut milk, and though the tahini flavor is present here, it’s not overpowering. It mostly lends an extra-creamy texture to the coconut milk base, which makes this vegan ice cream really exceptional.

Dairy-free ice cream

How to Make Non-Dairy Ice Cream

The night before you plan to make your dairy-free ice cream, freeze the base of your ice cream maker. I love my KitchenAid® Ice Cream Maker Attachment  because it saves space and it does a great job with homemade ice cream. It should be in the freezer for at least 12 hours before you proceed with the recipe!

The next day, whisk together the coconut milk, tahini, and maple syrup to create the ice cream base. If your coconut milk is chunky, use a food processor or blender to whir the ingredients into a smooth puree.

Then, pour the mixture into the base of your ice cream maker and churn until thick! Mine takes about 20 minutes, but the timing will depend on your machine. Refer to your manufacturer’s instructions for timing guidelines.

When the ice cream is thick, scoop and enjoy, or freeze it for 1-2 hours for an even thicker texture.

Vegan ice cream recipe

Vegan Ice Cream Recipe Tips

  • Spice it up! Try adding a pinch of cinnamon or cardamom or a drop of vanilla to the coconut milk base for an extra layer of flavor.
  • Don’t forget the toppings. I love this dairy-free ice cream on its own, but it’s delicious with toppings as well. I served mine with tart cherries, melted dark chocolate, vegan chocolate chips, and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.
  • Eat it right away, or freeze it for up to a week. This vegan ice cream has the perfect creamy, smooth texture right after it comes out of the ice cream maker. Enjoy it as soon as it’s done, or store it in airtight containers in the freezer for up to a week. It hardens while it’s in the freezer, so if you’re planning to serve it 24 hours or more after you make it, let it soften at room temperature for 20 minutes before scooping it into bowls.
Vegan Ice Cream

Best Vegan Ice Cream

Prep time: 20 mins

Total time: 20 mins

 This easy dairy-free ice cream is so rich and delicious! The tahini doesn’t have an overpowering flavor here; it mostly lends an extra-creamy texture to the coconut milk base.

Author: Jeanine Donofrio

Recipe type: Dessert Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 (14-ounce) can full fat coconut milk
  • ⅓ cup pure maple syrup
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • (optional) toppings: sesame seeds, tart cherries, chocolate

Instructions

  1. Freeze the base of your KitchenAid® Ice Cream Attachment for at least 12 hours, preferably overnight.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the coconut milk, tahini, and maple syrup. (If your coconut milk is chunky, you may want to combine the ingredients in a blender).
  3. Pour the mixture into the ice cream maker and churn until thick, about 20 minutes. Scoop out and enjoy! If you would like thicker ice cream, freeze for 1-2 hours before serving.

Notes : When you store your ice cream in the fridge for over 24 hours, it’ll harden. Let it sit at room temp for about 20 minutes to soften before scooping.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

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Beef rendang & turmeric rice

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

Beef rendang & turmeric rice

By Good Food

PREP: 40 MINS

COOK: 2 HRS, 30 MINS

EASYSERVES 6

Cover beef shin in coconut milk and spices and add toasted desiccated coconut to thicken the rich sauce in this slow-cooked Malaysian

  • Freezable

Nutrition: per serving

  • kcal 1405
  • fat 71g
  • saturates 37g
  • carbs 108g
  • sugars 8g
  • fiber 4g
  • protein 81g
  • salt 0.8g

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2kg beef shin or skirt, cut into bite-sized cubes
  • 2 lemongrass stalks, bashed (see ‘Tip’ for how to prepare)
  • 2 x 400ml cans coconut milk
  • 4 tbsp desiccated coconut
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves, torn
  • 1½ tbsp chicken stock powder (we used one from an Asian supermarket)
  • 2 tbsp tamarind paste
  • 1 tsp golden caster sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt

For the paste

  • 15 dry chillies
  • 6-8 baby shallots
  • thumb-sized piece ginger, chopped
  • thumb-sized piece galangal, peeled and chopped (use ginger if you can’t find it)
  • 3 lemongrass stalks, chopped

For the rice

  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 10 curry leaves (optional)
  • 700g jasmine rice
  • 2 tsp chicken stock powder

Method

  1. For the paste, soak the chillies in boiling water for 15 mins. Drain, remove seeds and whizz with the rest of the paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth.
  2. Heat the oil in a wok or a heavy-based flameproof casserole dish. Fry the paste for 5 mins until the aroma is released. Add the beef and the lemongrass, and mix well. Once the beef starts to lose its pinkness, add the coconut milk and 250ml water. Bring to the boil, then lower to a simmer, uncovered. Stir occasionally to avoid sticking, and more often towards the end.
  3. Meanwhile, toast the coconut in a frying pan on a low heat for 5-7 mins until golden brown. Set aside to cool. Using a blender, coarsely blend it to finer pieces – but not too fine. Put to one side.
  4. After 2 hrs, add the coconut, kaffir lime leaves, chicken stock powder, tamarind paste, sugar and salt to the pan. Simmer for 30 mins more. You should start to see the oil separating from the mix. It’s ready when the meat is tender and almost falling apart.
  5. For the rice, use a heavy-based saucepan with a lid. Heat the oil in the pan and add the mustard seeds. Once the seeds start popping, add the turmeric, curry leaves (if using) and rice, and mix well. Add the chicken stock and 1 litre of water. Bring to the boil, then turn down to the lowest simmer and cook, covered, for 5 mins. Remove from the heat, with the lid on and leave to steam for 25 mins.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

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New York to parents: Choose your job — or your kids

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

By Karol Markowicz | June 29, 2020 | 7:50pm 

Children and parents on first day of school in NYC in 2018.
Children and parents on first day of school in NYC in 2018.David McGlynn

Can Gov. Andrew Cuomo take a break from his televised pretend-victory lap, put his head together with Mayor Bill de Blasio and figure out how to open schools across the state full-time in September?

We hear a lot about “privilege” and how we have to “check” ours. But there is no one more privileged than rich politicians — with grown children and an insane amount of power to decide who can and can’t work — planning some cockamamie part-time school opening for the fall.

Recently, the city Department of Education sent a “Return-to-School Survey” to parents, asking them to rank the safety precautions they would like schools to take. The key question: “If we need to begin school next year mixing both in-person learning at school and learning at home in order to follow health and safety guidelines, please rank the scheduling options presented below from most preferred (1) to least preferred (3).”

The answer’s options included alternating weeks of in-school and online learning, sending kids to school on certain days of the week and full online-only. No full-time in-person ­option was provided.

How exactly are parents supposed to work full-time while their kids are in school part-time? Who is bringing them to and from school, only on certain days, and who is with them the rest of the time? “Let the nanny do it,” goes the unspoken diktat. If you don’t have a nanny, or other child-care help, well, that’s your problem.

Schools are realizing they wouldn’t even have enough space to implement the half-online, half-in-person plan.

As Selim Algar reported for The Post this month, a principal at PS 107 in Brooklyn has already sounded the alarm that, given the size of her school, current social-distancing protocols would force her to divide her student body into three sections, with each cohort attending in-person every third week.

Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza confirmed that reality and added: “I think it’s going to require all of us to be very flexible.” How reassuring.

Parents whose jobs are restarting wonder how in the world they can be that flexible. In effect, officials are forcing them to choose between their jobs and livelihoods and any hope of learning and developmental progress for their kids.

The worst part: The state and city are insisting on this — even as death and hospitalization rates continue to fall in New York, and even as we know that children are at minuscule risk from COVID-19; the death rate for those who do get it is likewise minuscule.

There are other dangers in the world that threaten children far more grievously, yet we don’t keep them locked inside. Which is why the American Academy of Pediatrics last week released a statement “strongly” urging that “all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school.”

But what about the adults who work at the school, goes the counterargument. Don’t they matter? Children are not very “effective spreaders” of the disease, according to scientists. Besides, won’t adults still eventually be exposed to 100 percent of the kids as well as each other under the 50/50 plan?

This summer is already a disaster for many parents. Many day camps around the city didn’t open. The reopen directive from Cuomo either came too late for them to open for the summer, or they found the strict guidelines too onerous.

nursery room interior view

The governor’s arbitrary decisions with regard to other businesses are radiating uncertainty and chaos. Last week, he announced that many businesses in Phase Four won’t be able to open after all. Inexplicably, malls, movie theaters and gyms are being denied the opportunity to prove they can open safely. The fear among parents is that schools, also in Phase Four, will share that same fate.

New York isn’t the only place living with COVID-19. Connecticut and Massachusetts schools have announced that they’re ­reopening fully in the fall. Denmark, Israel, Austria, Norway, Australia and New Zealand have all reopened schools. Britain’s government announced last week that it will open schools and scrap any plans for the kids to socially distance.

We should be sane and follow their lead. Instead, we’re stuck with a governor who likes to play emergency executive on TV — and seems to have gotten the wrong idea about our state’s nickname. The Empire State doesn’t, in fact, have an elected emperor.

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

Paula M Naranjo

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Black Parents Who Worry ‘The Talk’ Is Not Enough Turn To De-Escalation Training

Paula M Naranjo/Parent Editor

BY OLIVIA RIÇHARD IN NEWS ON JULY 1, 2020 6:00 AM

A Black Lives Matter protest in May. (Chava Sanchez/LAist)

Conversations about how to interact with police — and what to do if stopped — happened so frequently in Kimmia Sanders’ home, they seemed normal. That’s the reality for many young people growing up in Black homes across the country.

“As a child, my mom was always talking to me about how to carry myself being a young Black woman in America,” she said. “Being Black, you have to handle certain situations differently because if you’re not careful things can go south really quickly.”

Learning to navigate the world while being Black isn’t developed overnight. It’s a lesson often taught through constant conversations. Others prefer to take a more hands-on approach.

“As a mother raising two Black children in America, I have an obligation to teach them how to identify danger,” said Kim Sanders, Kimmia’s mother. “Being Black in America is a really hard thing… in some cases it can cost you your life.”

MORE THAN WORDS

Kimmia Sanders, now 18, was in elementary school the first time she had a safety drill. She remembers crouching under her school desk, arms over her head and hands gripping the skinny metal table legs, practicing what to do in the event of an earthquake.

Like many students, safety drills for fire, earthquake, active shooter, lockdown and evacuation all were a regular part of her school experience. Sanders said they taught her from a young age the importance of not only preparing mentally for a crisis, but physically as well.

For the last four years, she’s been running a different kind of crisis drill, this one outside the traditional classroom.

The Young Black Scholars program, run by the nationwide mentoring organization 100 Black Men, works to teach Black youth how to navigate high-stakes situations that have the potential to escalate, particularly when police officers are involved and there is a tilted power dynamic.

“The reason we focus on law-enforcement encounters is because you have to understand what the police officer is thinking,” said Jewett L. Walker Jr., who chairs the board of 100 Black Men L.A.

To date, the 100 Black Men organization has more than 100 chapters operating in cities and communities across the country, running programs aimed at empowering youth to navigate the complicated terrain of what it means to be Black in America.

Walker said despite stay-at-home orders, the nonprofit has continued to provide mentorship, tutoring and de-escalation training to students through virtual means, to keep up support for participants.

Program mentors work with students in three key areas:

  • anger management
  • conflict resolution
  • role playing

The goal is to teach participants how to calm themselves, calm others and stay calm under pressure.

Students are deliberately put in uncomfortable and confrontational situations using actual police involved with the program. Kimmia Sanders said that way, if it happens in real life, it’s not the first time they’ve dealt with it.

“You have to be present in the situations because seeing how things can get out of hand so quickly prepares you to stay calm and be compliant,” said Kimmia. “Situations can become unreasonable so quickly and sometimes it’s out of our hand.”

Controlled role-playing situations that have students confronting actual police officers allows the participants to develop behavioral and communication strategies aimed at increasing the likelihood they will walk away alive.

“If it is dark and it’s just you and a police officer, it’s suicide to try and challenge the officer under those situations,” Walker said. “You never know what could trigger an officer to violence, so we teach (students) just to be calm.”

A COMMUNITY IN TRAUMA

De-escalation programs like the Young Black Scholars have become an increasingly more common resource within the Black community, especially in the wake of recent high-profile deaths of Black men and women across the country.

“There comes a time when you have an understanding of what it means to be Black, and the responsibility and the roles that you don’t necessarily want but have to embrace,” said Kim Sanders. “I wanted something more exceptional for Kimmia so that I wouldn’t miss a beat on her development.”

Kimmia Sanders said being a part of the Young Black Scholars has empowered her to speak up.

“I’ve learned a lot about myself, particularly the power of my voice,” she said. “I used to be soft-spoken and shy, but now I really know the importance of speaking up in an eloquent and informed manner — which can be really helpful when speaking to people who may not be receptive to what you have to say.”

Programs like the Young Black Scholars have proven an invaluable resource for so many young Black men and women. But Walker — himself a father of a young Black man — says a level of subconscious resentment accompanies the gratitude that parents feel for programs like this.

“Yes, we are providing critical behavioral and strategic response training and serving as a developmental resource for our community. But at the same time, as a parent, it’s always in the back of your mind that this is necessary because your child is under attack,” Walker said. “It’s your kid’s responsibility to quell a confrontation, even though the police are the ones with the training. It’s frustrating.”

Nevertheless, Walker says 100 Black Men will continue working with students, to help teach them skills that could end up keeping them alive.

“As parents and leaders in our community, we know you can’t control someone else,” Walker said. “The only thing we can control is how we respond to others, and that’s what we impress upon our students — set the example for how you want the situation to unfold.”

We would love to hear from you, have a story, tip or recipe you would like to share with our readers? Feel free to email it to throughlovewelearn@gmail.com. 

Nos encantaría saber de usted, tener una historia, un consejo o una receta que le gustaría compartir con nuestros lectores. No dude en enviarlo por correo electrónico a través throughlovewelearn@gmail.com.

Paula M Naranjo

IG: Paulamarienaranjo

FB: MarieNaranjo

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The story behind the masterpiece

By: Angelica L. Owens/Beauty Editor 

“For me, Art is restoration of order. It may discuss all sorts of terrible things, but there must be satisfaction at the end. A little bit of hunger, but also satisfaction.”- Toni Morrison

Harmony Granderson, a rising Sophomore at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University painted this mural to shed light on the Black Lives Matter movement. She also wanted to pay homage to the A&T Four, who started the Sit-In Movement in 1960, here in Greensboro, NC.

Harmony used her artistic expression to try to make a positive impact in the city. However, a lot of people had a problem with her painting, just because she was Biracial. She attended a Historically Black University to get in tune with her blackness even more. She never thought that those same people would be the ones to put her down and have negative comments to say about her painting.

Even though she wanted this to be a positive piece to bring to downtown Greensboro, there have been many misconceptions about the painting. Many people thought that she was glorifying the last words of George Floyd, Eric Garner, Javier Ambler, and many others who have lost their lives from police brutality when in reality, she was trying to say that as black people, we can not breathe. Harmony added the logo of the University to honor the Aggies who paved the way for social and political change.

Since she is both an Activist and a Social Media Influencer, the painting has had both negative and positive influences. While she lost a lot of followers and friends who were worried about ruining their reputation, she grew thicker skin and mind strengthening strategies, She learned how to stand her ground and how to stop over-explaining herself when it is redundant.

Angelica L. Owens
IG: angellorine
Twitter AngelLorine1
FB: Angel Lorine Owens

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